The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

WordPress, iPad and HTML5 vs. Flash

March23

interesting news from the bowels of WordPress, itself.

HTML5 is kicking Flash’s butt. that’s not the news, itself. but, it’s a great point.

with the launch of Apple’s iPad they have apparently seen the future of computing and it is touch. a recent blog post from them, to all of us, says nothing matches the visceral feel of navigating your digital world with your hands. the past four months they’ve been working closely with Onswipe to bring our iPad visitors a WordPress vision of what a blog can look like, re-imagined for a touch experience.

the WordPress iPad-optimized view is app-like in its functionality, but pure HTML5 goodness on the backend: it supports touch interactions, swiping, rotation, and many other features of the iPad. this is very similar to when they launched the smartphone-optimized WP-Touch integration in 2009 (now apparently responsible for over 150 million page views a month). it’s immediately available and active on the over 18 million blogs onWordPress.com.

as the iPad2 continues to blow-away all forecasts, while leaving any PC/ Android tablet hopes languishing with Adobe’s Flash in utter despair, we are now likely getting insight into the future winner in terms of interactivity and media on websites, and beyond.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

 

posted under Technology | 2 Comments »

the Flash on Apple debate isn't PC

August13

It appears that European Union regulators are joining forces with the Federal Trade Commission here in the U.S. through a probe of Apple’s policy regarding “mobile software developers.” (This means: Flash on the iPhone.)

I’m advised by insiders that Apple will be further confronted over the controversial “Flash on iPhone” policy. As you know, Apple claims that Adobe’s Flash isn’t “sufficiently advanced for use on smart-phones”, and has effectively banned its use on their iOS devices, both as a platform as well as its use to help program applications.

If they call me to testify as an expert witness, I’d likely offer this line-of-thinking and example:

I’ve known many PC users over the course of my life, and work passionately to help them transition to the Mac OS (it’s perfectly okay to drop the Mac OS onto a Dell, for example, like Nicholas Johnson did for me on a dare, of sorts).

But, for the purpose of this post, I’ll focus on a close friend of mine named Chuck. Many of you have read his book, and I coached him through one of the most monumental acquisitions in North America.

Chuck is a PC survivor (I wonder if that phrase and context will catch on. You read it, here, first). He languished in that world of restarts and hangups for almost sixteen years.

We discuss the Adobe and Flash story fairly often because it has created terrific impetus for change and a kind of thought leadership around reverse accountability. Chuck knew all too well about third-party applications and programs causing instability on the original platform. How many times do you download a program that requires a plug-in to run on your system? He’s posed that question, and often. How many times has a new program or plug-in been the proverbial “fly in the ointment” of your Operating System? Many PC sufferers ask both questions. But, never, as a hearty and ferocious macintoshionist (I just coined that as well), would say, I.

Chuck’s house has been one hundred percent Apple (PC free) since January 2008. iPods, Macbooks, iMacs, iTV, Extreme Base Stations, iPhones and now iPads abound. When the Apple vs. Adobe story began to break Chuck called me from his iPhone (decidedly not a Blackberry) to express his gratitude towards me and Steve Jobs for developing devices that “just work”. Turn the device on; it works. The story is simple with the elegance of Apple design and utilization. NOTE: I fully expect to hear from a few of you that still want to harp on the iPhone 4’s reception issue. But, I’ll wave you off dismissively and advise you to stop grasping desperately at a futile effort to find a weakness in the that tasty [sic] Apple.

So… Steve Jobs is likely telling us the truth and Flash will destabilize the iPhone and the iPod Touch. If that’s the case he is demonstrating accountability by kicking Flash to the curb. He is forcing Adobe to improve it’s product – and, that is fair and reasonable. It’s aligned with the Laws of Natural Selection. Improve or die. If Adobe wants to occupy the apple mobile platform, they should step up and (re)write something more stable that does not use a lion’s share of power (this is another issue with Flash that does not get enough press, eh).

Why should Apple allow an unstable piece of software on a system that, otherwise,  just works?

Adobe comes across like an entitled Google neophyte with weak points and self-inflicted bitter frustration. Apple sets the standard for quality. And, Steve Jobs simply expects everyone around him, and his best-of-products, to work smart and keep up.

That’s okay. And, let’s hope the European Union recognizes this – just as discerning users of technology have around the globe have by buying ever-more Apple products.

You can whine, or drink wine. So, I’m buying a vineyard.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

the iPad will change the value of a dollar

April10

The iPad had a great opening week and will have a gangbuster first year as it “…changes media” as many pundita are want to crow. But it’s not about this first year. It’s also not about saving the media business, which it won’t.

As most of you know, I’ve evangelized Apple and it’s products for twenty six years. I’m an early adopter of all things Apple, and I have owned several hundred desktops and mobile devices (laptops, iPhones, etc) across my personal life, family and business.

Now we have the iPad.

I’ve found it to be a useful “peripheral computer”, a unique device that complements, rather than replaces, existing computers and smartphones. It also extends Apple’s mobile, touch-based platform (iTunes 9.1 on Mac or Windows is a pre-requisite to set up an iPad, connecting via the device’s dock-USB cable (or an optional iPad USB dock). You also must be running Leopard (Mac OS X 10.5) or later; the iPad won’t even talk with iTunes 9.1 on Mac OS X 10.4.), adding even more energy to a vibrant “ecosystem,” which is controlled from top to bottom by Apple but also benefits from the creativity and hard work of a growing army of third-party developers.

Aside from serving as a media repository (for music, movies, podcasts, photos, audiobooks and ebooks), iTunes also makes backups and controls software (firmware) updates, provides iPad-to-Mac/PC file exchange with selected apps (including Pages, Keynote and Numbers, and some third party apps such as OmniGraffle), and keeps your calendars, contacts, Safari bookmarks and mail account settings in sync with your Mac or PC.

All that said, mind you, there are two revolutionary and profound things going on here:

  1. The iPad’s price
  2. The way in which the iPad is likely to be used, which is fundamentally different than how both computers AND mobile gadgets are used

On price, I don’t mean the price for the full-fledged 3G 64G iPad version ($829), which is way too expensive for a big mobile device (especially with the $30/month AT&T contract). We mean the price for the stripped down WiFi-only 16G version: $499.

And it’s not today’s $499 price that’s important… $499 is still too expensive for what the iPad is. From my vantage point, it’s where the $499 is headed over the next couple of years.

If iPad prices follow the trend of iPod, iPhone, and other gadget prices, we should be able to buy the low-end version for $299 in two years and $199 in three years. At $199, especially, the whole game changes.

Why?

Because of the way the iPad is likely to be used.

One of the primary use cases for the iPad is consuming media and puttering around the house. It’s not walking around (mobile) or working at a desk (office). The iPad is not about productivity benefits (the sales pitch for most PCs and laptops) nor communications benefits (the sales pitch for most mobile computing gadgets). It’s about media consumption and entertainment for the home.

In three years, when the low-end WiFi-powered iPad costs $199, many households will buy 3 or 4 of them and just leave them lying around the house. These iPads won’t be “owned” by any one member of the household, the way PCs and cell phones are. They won’t live on desks, the way desktops do, and they won’t be carried everywhere, the way mobile phones are. They’ll just be there, around the house, on tables and counters, the way today’s books, magazines, games, and newspapers are, booted up, ready to use.

You’ll be able to play two-person games on them (also revolutionary for a handheld device). You’ll be able read newspapers, magazines, emails, books. You’ll be able to tap out and send short messages. You’ll be able to research and shop. You’ll be able to keep and share family calendars. You’ll be able to sit around the breakfast table with each member of the family scrolling through one, the way many families still do with newspapers. You, your children, and your guests will, most importantly, just be able to walk around your house and pick one up.

At $199, Apple will eventually be able to sell tens of millions (eventually, hundreds of millions) of them a year ($199 x 100 million = $20 billion, not counting app and advertising revenue). Eventually, every household will have them. And as long as long as the iPad becomes a platform in addition to a device, the way the iPhone has (and it’s well on its way to doing this), Apple should be able to maintain a very healthy market share.

Eventually, in other words, the iPad should blow away even today’s towering expectations. And it should be amazing for both consumers and Apple shareholders alike.

The iPad, today, is a “peripheral computer” — a highly portable, touch-based, but limited-capability tablet. It is designed to be a companion to a larger, traditional personal computer that provides printing, software updates, media storage, backup and other services that are missing from the mobile tablet.

But, conceptually, the iPad is a blank canvas. The big screen becomes whatever it needs to be. It’s a transformative experience, and it enables the iPad to be something that the iPhone and iPod Touch never could be  – a creator’s tool.

By the way… I’ve been telling you to buy Apple stock most of my adult life. You’ve been reading that on this Blog. I’m saying it again. At $240, it’s still a bargain. Apple creates products you did not know you could not live without until you have them, literally, in your hands. Few companies can say that. Few will try. Apple will likely keep doing so for another twenty six years.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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