The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

A superior or unusual example of a kind

May21

Readers of this Blog understand that, from birth, I was trained to seek my wisdom and whatever fortune that might entail, through a path and study forged by logic and the classics.

This can and has included the of tilting windmills, facing that Kobayashi Maru, and honoring the face of my father by using the greatest of gifts discernment, will all my will and might.

Grandad said he could (and, he certainly did) describe me as: A superior or unusual example of a kind.

…I think that’s good.

Because I’ve lived the balance of my life trying, with all my heart and will, to earn it.

Along the way, understanding Socrates using the minds eye of Nick Pappas at Radford University with Thomas Jefferson and Ayn Rand as the lens.

Mind you… This just might help define me as an “Socalpreneur”.

A Socialpreneur is an individual who recognizes societal problems and then uses entrepreneurial skills to organize and create solutions.

Meanwhile, you might be relieved to know that I am also reading Nathaniel Philbrick’s The Last Stand. I can’t say this books is a classic. However, the story it reveals is founded in such notions, and the harbinger of inspiration. And, I’ll continue to work my way, with naught less than grim determination, and an eye for the bon mot, The Importance of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

a. Belonging to the highest rank or class.
b. Serving as the established model or standard: a classic example of colonial architecture.
c. Having lasting significance or worth; enduring.
d. Adhering or conforming to established standards and principles: a classic piece of research.
b. Of a well-known type; typical: a classic mistake.
e. Of or characteristic of the literature, art, and culture of ancient Greece and Rome; classical.
f. Formal, refined, and restrained in style.
g. Simple and harmonious; elegant: the classic cut of a suit; the classic lines of a clipper ship.
h. Having historical or literary associations: classic battlefields of the Civil War.
i. An artist, author, or work generally considered to be of the highest rank or excellence, especially one of enduring significance.
j. A work recognized as definitive in its field.
k. A literary work of ancient Greece or Rome.
l. classics The languages and literature of ancient Greece and Rome. Used with the.
m. One that is of the highest rank or class: The car was a classic of automotive design.
n. A typical or traditional example.
o. Informal A superior or unusual example of its kind: The reason he gave for being late was a classic.
7. A traditional event, especially a major sporting event that is held annually: a golf classic.
or,

1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the. a body of literature regarded as great or lasting, esp that of ancient Greece or Rome

2. (Social Science / Education) the. the ancient Greek and Latin languages

3. (Social Science / Education) (functioning as singular) ancient Greek and Roman culture considered as a subject for academic study


swine!

April8

Preamble:

The (deservedly) immortal Dr. Nick Pappas at Radford Univerity called those of us that yearned to be learned “swine!”. This might mean brutish, possibly contemptible, certainly ignorant. But, a badge of honor, as it turns out, because Dr. Pappas knew we had merit based on the desire to change for the better. We sought enlightenment.

There! I’ve set the stage…

But, and just so you know, I started drafting this post on Sunday while it was, potentially, apropos. But, I wanted my thoughts around Bill Pope to run a certain course. And, so they have. Then of course, many of you know I struggle, and mightily so, with the Jesus element. Although the example, as established by those two men, both now otherworldly, continue to abound.

Thusly, I had these words that I intended to post. But, none of them seem sufficient in the face of the enormity of the events of which that day (Easter Sunday) is a commemoration.  I probably don’t have to tell you that Jesus was killed, in the worst possible way, for the stupidest possible reasons, by, as Chesterton has pointed out, elsewhere, and paraphrased here, an unholy coalition of all that was more or less the best in both government and religion at the time.

Travesty is an insufficient descriptor. Or, opportunity. Because, yet another stage was, therefore, set.

In the midst of this, a thought: Love is the visible attribute of an invisible God.

So… If you are a Christian then you are of the opinion that the Lord is Risen!  So, rejoice, ye swine, for something greater than we had ever hoped is at hand.  No grave could hold Him.  No earth could keep Him down.  Hell itself was merely a brief sojourn; and, He didn’t come back alone. (According to the Bible and Gale Jackson) After forty days of gathering darkness, and the great falling blow of Good Friday, we may finally stand up tall again with our splendid and appalling King.  He brings not peace, but a sword; He brings us to a fight, but it is a good fight and, well worth the trouble.

I’m not a Christian, mind. you. But, I WANT to believe this can happen – or, has occurred.

Many of you raised your glass Sunday (but why not each and every day?), wherever you were, in honor of the One who conquered death and gave us life in abundance.  Take the Bread and the Wine, if you are able.  Be in fellowship.  Love your families, your friends, your colleagues, and even your loathsome, miserable enemies.  You may fling them to the ground, when the time comes, but on this day of days it is best to hope for better outcomes, and more noble.

This might lead us to take the position that it’s apparently faith, not proof, that makes Christians believe in Jesus Christ’s resurrection, the central tenet of the religion.

Well… Possibly until now.

I offer this because it’s being reported that Oxford University professor Richard Swinburne (I don’t know if he is or was a swine, but close enough!), a leading philosopher of religion, has seemingly done the impossible. He is using logic and mathematics to create a formula that he says shows a ninety seven percent (97%) certainty that Jesus Christ was resurrected by God the Father. This information reported by The Age and Catholic News (However, I pulled it off MSNBC, again). NOTE: Meanwhile, nothing particularly original here, as I’m confident you’ve read about this elsewhere (on this very Blog, to be sure),

Nonetheless, as a reminder, this stunning conclusion was made based on a series of complex calculations grounded in the following logic:

  1. The probability of God’s existence is one in two. That is, God either exists or doesn’t.
  2. The probability that God became incarnate, that is embodied in human form, is also one in two.
  3. The evidence for God’s existence is an argument for the resurrection.
  4. The chance of Christ’s resurrection not being reported by the gospels has a probability of one in 10.
  5. Considering all these factors together, there is a one in 1,000 chance that the resurrection is not true.

“New Testament scholars say the only evidences are witnesses in the four gospels. That’s only five percent of the evidence,” Swinburne said in a lecture he gave at the Australian Catholic University in Melbourne. “We can’t judge the question of the resurrection unless we ask first whether there’s reason to suppose there is a God. Secondly, if we have reason to suppose he would become incarnate, and thirdly, if he did, whether he would live the sort of life Jesus did.” He says that even Jesus’ life is not enough proof. However, the resurrection is “God’s signature,” which shows “his approval of Jesus’ teaching.”

I’ve called the good fellow, to verify his sincerity, but he has yet to return my call.

By way of reference, the calculations that Swinburne says prove the resurrection are detailed in his book, The Resurrection of God Incarnate. Download it to your Kindle, or iPad, I have. Do it!!!

In closing, as I round out my point… We know why God took Jesus (providing you follow the Bible, and Gale Jackson). However, we are still asking ourselves why God felt He needed Bill and Bryce more than we did. Unless the simple answer is the establishment of a compelling example, driven home, if you will, with an awful and dramatic flourish. Our attention is caught. Now we have that scienter in our lives.

This means we need to be ready.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

riddle, or paradox, or what ever

September20

Someone pointed me to a link showing a couple of religious leaflets that they’d found. It’s all quite interesting, in a flagellating kind of way, I suppose.

a leaflet

It took a lot of effort to load one of them into this post, and I’m not at all, not all, I tell you, convinced it’s worth the effort. And, after all my work, it’s still grainy, almost like some form of pornography, and difficult to read – let alone fathom. Just use your imagination. You have, after all seen hundreds just like  it. And, if you haven’t, it’s no true tragedy. I say this because, after all, it’s a religious artifact. God will live on, one way or another, well past the point the bloody leaflet is dust.

Why are things like this called “leaflets”, any way?

In any event, I don’t really understand something about the evangelist logic illustrated in things like leafllets and religious artifacts, in general. In their analogy (use your imagination here – or, perhaps you’ve decided to, otherwise, take a nap, especially if Georgia is playing in an American football game), I’m a terrible felon standing in front of a judge; I’m guilty of murder and theft, among many other crimes. I should probably go to prison, as I’m clearly a danger to society.

Yet evangelists would posit that a monetary fine would pay for my crimes, and it doesn’t even have to be me who pays it. Jesus will apparently pay the fine, and I can leave the court that very day. I suppose I’d have to promise to pay him back – but as they point out in the first part of the leaflet, I’m a liar as well as a thief. I am man, after all. Apparently, and according to those ferocious evangelists, God made man to sin, and not made man capable of sin, which puts a different spin on everything.

Perhaps it’s all a form of cosmic riddle.

The key to freedom, as it were, is accepting Jesus.

So, if I do pay Jesus back, by being his friend (or, at least asking him over for a play date), I get to go to heaven. Although I remain a sinner even when I’m friends with him.

Why would Jesus want so many evil friends? Unless it’s to make him look all the more noble by association.

I understand the “evil friend” question is where everyone is going to pounce on me, with a love of course.

The more I find out about Christianity, as a religion, as opposed to simply coming to grips with a mighty God, and how I make that work for everyone around me (truth and light, reflecting and representing, etc. /1), the stranger it seems.

Paradox(?) you might pondering a this point… Well, perhaps it’s that point where you must face the difference between faith, religion, belief and discernment. It’s after all, why God gave you a brain – and, made it larger (not necessarily better) than a dog /2 or chimpanzee’s (cats don’t count, ever.).

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

________________________

1/ I could hyperlink to many examples of my prior work on these topics. However, they’ve become copious in number. So, it’s a lot of work. And, if you actually cared (and, I understand many of you do, and will, ultimately), you’ll search and sort them out. All you need is the desire and proactive nature to utilize the search feature offered to the left of this post.

2/ One of my favorite posts: Sammy: The best argument I ever knew for Dogs in Heaven has now been read over 4,000,000 times. It’s being read in schools (one teacher told me it’s how he gets around the ban on religious (ouch) information. That’s fine. It’s kinda like being a pirate. Certainly a Prudent Gentleman.

Off topic: I think it’s funny that spell check doesn’t correct the word ‘kinda’.

socrates with jefferson as a lens

July28

i found myself in a tight spot with a client this very day. i could see he was ethically challenged.

there was, and remains, a lot at stake. i felt compelled to intervene and demonstrate an equitable path.

i remembered the face of my father and the words of dr. nick pappas.

socrates understood.

and, i was inspired.

today i changed a heart – if not history. that is a demonstration of the sweetest kind of victory.

peace be to my brothers and sisters.

brian patrick cork

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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