The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

we are life Lessons

February28

brandon at work

so…

as many of you know I’ve dis

covered Humans of New York. its a fun, interesting, and thought provoking platform for insight and reflection.

we are a culture of story-tellers and listeners. so, we relate to the pathos and charm of our neighbors from that place.

yesterday I took a moment to ponder and borrow some of Brandon’s stuff and mash-it-up into a story-line of my own (I do this with other peoples work from time-to-time).

in any event, here is a brief bio from his Humans of New York blogsite that struck me with an interesting point and potential life lesson:

“Hey there.  I’m Brandon.  I get really passionate about things.  At some time in my life, I’ve been obsessed or borderline-obsessed with saltwater aquariums, the baritone euphonium, reading, piano, filming, financial markets, New York City, and photography.  I studied History at the University of Georgia.  During my senior year of college, I took out $3,000 in student loans and bet it on Barack Obama to win the presidency.  A friend heard about this bet and got me a job trading bonds on the Chicago Board of Trade.  I traded for three years.  It went really well for awhile.  But then it went really bad.Whoops. After I lost my trading job, I decided to move to New York City and take portraits of strangers on the street. Mom wasn’t too happy about that decision, but so far it’s gone pretty well. I’ve taken nearly 5,000 portraits and written 50 stories. And I’ve met some amazing people along the way.

Thanks for visiting Humans of New York.
Feel free to drop me a line at honybrandon@gmail.com. For interview/speech/press/business requests: honyassist@gmail.com.”

while I think its cool he attended the University of Georgia, and don’t find myself the least surprised (I’ve met some incredibly gifted people that came out of that school. they do some great things with the right types of minds), I picked-up on his adventures around trading bonds…

my sense of Brandon is a man of deep should and a keen desire to connect with people and share their stories; give them depth on a a very unusual level. however, he makes it seem that losing a bunch (of other people’s) money, if that’s what occurred was a simple hurdle on the path of a road yet travelled with its potential yet to be fully realized. so, what about that story, and the people that shared that possibly devastating sequence of events?

now I wonder if his journey to tell other people’s stories and save stray dogs is a form of penance. while I doubt that, the stage set and my observations possibly demonstrate how our imaginations can find stories in the midst, and finish them in all manner of distortion, or clarity in the form of provocative photographs.

I suppose my point, here, is that there is so much more to us than we can write, read, photograph, and demonstrate. we are an accumulation of things and stuff, fears and travails, heroics, and not so much, that will never be completed until other people want to tell our stories and spin them in a way that suits a purpose.

what story does your own picture tell today?

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

should a wise man shed his weakness?

June25

I’ve deliberately (I had initially used the word: “purposefully”, but after debated consideration, made the careful change) torn the final page from Louis L’Amour‘s memoir, Education of a Wandering Man, which contains an excerpt from a Robinson Jeffers poem titled “Wise Men in Their Bad Hours”:

Death’s a fierce meadowlark: but to die having made

Something more equal to centuries

Than muscle and bone, is mostly to shed weakness.

The mountains are dead stone, the people

Admire or hate their stature, their insolent quietness,

The mountains are not softened or troubled

And a few dead men’s thoughts have the same temper.

why I might do such a thing is a worthy and valid question, certainly.

it might have something to do with being a Dad. having a teenaged daughter keeps me on my toes. my judgment, sensibilities, fashion-sense, and coolness factor come into question constantly, and at the most (chinese) interesting junctures in time, at the hands (and, temperament of Haley Anne). but, I’d not trade a moment of it, for anything.

the question at hand, and it’s ponderousness (is that thinking?) might also find it’s genesis in my on-going experience with CEO’s, and being a kind of CEO, myself. for perspective, see my recent business “blogsite” post: CEO’s and ego’s – a cautionary tale.

…oh… my point?

it may well be legacy.

I’ve found that if I set aside my temper, ego, image, and other self-centered perspective, and try to see it from Haley Anne’s vantage point (also asking her the inductive why as often as possible) I can find, at least, the middle ground, and we both win, and I get more hugs. and, she has a better chance of evolving into a vital contributor to our society.

I’ve grown confident that most Fathers (of the earthly variety, anyway) and CEO’s are the weakest link of any organization. but, if you plan for the group under your care properly it means selflessly making them all stronger and better than yourself.

I may be a miserable creature (I can neither carry a tune, or dance a reasonable jig). but, I can pour myself into those around me, and make us all the better.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

 


shakespeare and quixote and life

May7

I haven’t been myself of late.

I’m going to die, and it’s hard understanding comprehending that.

All of which means that I am out of my element and doing a great deal of reading, almost none of it pleasant.  I have forced myself to make time to care about other things, and I’m disinclined to fiddle about even with leisurely pursuits, except when I simply can’t take it anymore. That’s when I run, and hard, like few mortal men are capable of.

Aside from that milestone, and considerations abounding what happens next, there is a lot happening in my life – and more or less importantly, in other people’s lives. And, I worry about all of them. It’s a self-imposed burden. I might also pause, here, and ponder if it might be self-evident, but others, will most certainly call it, now or later, self-indulgent. But, regardless of my legacy, be it evident today or tomorrow, I feel responsible – for everything and every body. Just so we are clear on the subjects, I don’t feel guilty about what’s been happening with Brett Michaels (the former lead singer for the 80’s “glam band” Poison), although the ecolological travesty unleashed upon us and the shorelines of  the Gulf Coast by British Petroleum has me on edge.

However, I see a glimmer of hope. Nearly four hundred years after the death of William Shakespeare (some called him Bard, while I know him as impish), scholars are ready to add a new play to his canon.

It’s true. You can read something about the events, unfolding by the hour, here.

The play is called Double Falsehood, or the Distressed Lovers and it’s believed, by the Prudent Gentlemen, anyway, that Shakespeare wrote the play, but found itself improved upon by, another dramatiste, John Fletcher, a Jacobean Playwright (The Jacobean era refers to the period in English and Scottish history that coincides with the reign of King James I (1603– 1625) of England, who was also James VI of Scotland.) who followed Shakespeare as official playwright for the King’s Men.

The play is apparently based on an earlier work by Shakespeare, based on an episode from Cervantes’ classic Don Quixote. Rest assured, this is naught less than a cause celebre for the Prudent Gentlemen, and an object de gravitas for myself. Consider my passion for Quixote, here: tilting don quixote.

“Double Falsehood has thrills, spills, sword fights, violent sexual assault and to, most modern ears, the potential for a terrible ending.”

I’ll trust that Haley Anne and Emma Jo will read these words, perhaps one day. Without the eye-rolls I suffer today, the effort that is Double Falsehood, will be evaluated, with conviction, remembering the face of their father, and perhaps with fondness over his keen sense of proprieties.

Anyway, whenever it is, I’ll surely await its coming with unseemly interest.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

mortality and other such nonsense

August10

I once, and only once, pondered my own mortality (I also once lived vicariously through myself. But this, is yet, another interesting story). But, that was much too limiting. So, I discarded such a barren and also bleak notion. How could the world endure such daunting misery plagued with the absence of a man such as myself?

Each and every day can represent it’s own Kobayashi Maru. Certainly we face the extreme moments when a situation looks nothing less than impossible and, even more so, desperate. But, we punch through, And, some how, almost regardless the result, the effort creates something – any thing, better.

It makes ever so much more sense to live the fruitful life. And, if we can’t live forever in the mortal flesh, then each day; all of them, should be designed to create naught but the most lasting, enduring and meaningful legacy.

Oh… And, coaching youth soccer (girls in particular) keeps all of this in perspective.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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