The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

I hope you will write about Me some days

April18

Aaron Masih and I have a good many things in common.

that makes me fortunate, I think.

but, to add just a bit of clarity to that, we are both all about our daughters. and, we work, mostly as an effort to be great examples to those gifts from God, and also to do our own vital part in making sure this country and world is fit for those next-generation leaders.

recently Aaron and I have also shared some challenges, just in different zip codes.

I was in that automobile accident, referred to here in Milton, Georgia as, “the accident”. my broken ribs still make it tough to simply breathe. however, that does not reduce how lucky I feel. and, Aaron woke up in the middle of the night losing blood at an alarming rate, with a hole in his stomach.

we all lose friends. but, many of you know I was hit particularly hard by the loss of Bill Pope (in fact a lot of you were, and you may never understand how or why). Aaron lost a youth guidance counselor mentor that dated back almost twenty five years ago named Stan Annandale. Aaron talks about Mr. Annandale in a post he wrote, Remembering One of The Best People I Ever Knew.

this past weekend, and over the course of an email exchange I told Aaron:

“there is now a void that can only be filled by your being the sort of man someone else will write about.”

after I sent that email I found myself thinking that really is the man I want to be. in my daughters future, that of their own children – and, everyone I meet, for that matter; possibly those I don’t, but can still impact.

I tell many people stories about goodly men like my own Grandad, and Bill Pope. I’m working, and daily, to be the sort of man other people use as good examples of great deeds (to be sure, I can easily be used as an example of what NOT to do, from time-to-time). so, let’s be clear… I don’t necessarily need to be a hero. however, I try every day to make a meaningful difference. I literally live my life in that fashion. sometimes that may seem as though I am trying to be bigger than life, and I really push, hard. but, that’s the point. I’m not shy about that, and I won’t shy away from that stance. I have but only this life. and, I don’t know when that privilege, of being, will stop.

I want to keep meeting great people. and, I also want to keep helping other people be as great as they can be.

in my community there is always a great deal of talking about Mission work; “going on a Mission”. we live in the South, so when it come to the Bible belt, we may well be the buckle.

in any event, this typically means going away to some foreign country, using someone else’s money, on a form of holiday. but, God puts people in our paths each and every day that we can have enormous impact with in business or even our own backyard. last night, at a U16 soccer match, one of the opposing coaches came up to me straight away and said:

“I remember you from the Lake Lanier tournament back in 2007. I was so impressed with your positive attitude and the way you handled those kids”.

I feel that He (God, not that coach) has me in a career-path, and a life-path, of sorts that makes it my personal mission to make people around me better each and every day. that is part of having the perfect job, if not FOCUS. so, one of my prayers is simple, just like my mission:

“please help me meet the right people every day.”

thanks for being my Brother Aaron. and, I really do miss you Bill.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

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two sides rhymes with suicide

June9

Readers of this Blog appear to track, enjoy, and possibly value, my transparency. So, it’s no surprise, here, that my earthly father surrendered his soul to God back in 1986, on the eve of my birthday.

I’ve chosen some words carefully in that preamble because I’m evaluating the difference in terms of how we define suicide.

Background Perspective: I have a client that I’ve coached for years that happens to be a fairly well known Congressman and has always feared the path of “political suicide” often realized by all too many of his fellows.

Although I have to good-naturedly roll my eyes with that, it recently raised some thoughts in my head around how we spin things to make them work within the complicated confines of our society – to include faith and community.

Here we go…

Shortly after my Dad’s body was discovered (today that still feels strange to both write and read), slumped over a Zane Grey (apropos, says I) novel in his garage, his secretary tearfully advised me that he was bound for hell. I was a younger man in both body and mind, at the time, and this decree almost floored me. Dad was a genuine hero. And, he was… Well, my Dad. And, he loved my Mom. Together, they set the bar and standard for me in terms of how to be a parent to my own Daughters, and love people in your life. He was a pillar of strength (even when he had his fourth martini after a grueling Day maintaing peace as a Military Officer during a relentless Cold War era), always there for my younger brother and me. He was some times an enigma, mind you. But always smart, witty and resolute. Read my post: do not miss your Chance to blow it for perspective. Dot It! How could such a man face the abyss?

My first thought when told Dad was going to hell was that he had carefully considered his options and rolled the dice hoping to get back to Mom quicker. Selfishly, maybe, I often have this picture in my head of Mom and Dad in their early 40’s – sun-tanned, holding hands and smiling. This is also a reminder that Mom had died the year before (here is some additional background), and Dad was simply never the same after that. So… You can; and, I think you should, read my prior Blog post that explores some of that here: My Dad: Story 22 – Married for Life.

So… With all that said, what is the difference in someone taking their own life, or giving their life back to God? There is a paradox at work, here, because a potential juxtaposition includes (or, is) considerations around soldiers taking life (possibly in the name of God), and giving (as in dedicating) your life to God. My Dad was a soldier that absolutely did take lives under a national flag that was founded with God in mind (just ask Thomas Jefferson who is likely spinning in his grave enough these days to send the planet off it’s axis). He was a model citizen by any definition. And, in the his final hour I feel he gave his life back to God, and Mom was his reward for a life well-lived.

NOTE: I’m choosing to take the Bible out of the evaluative formula and going with discernment – perhaps the greatest tool God has issued to us to help me work through this process. The Bible, I feel, in this case, and of course many others, stymies broad thinking and open-mindedness (have you ever tried to debate a Christian and seen them not get heated, and more often than not, nasty?). Once you make not referencing the Bible part of the process, creative thinking that draws upon all of mankind’s marvelous experience and theory can now come into play for informed decision-making.

I’m tempted to drop a poll into this Blog post to capture your collective opinion. However, I’m only marginally interested in that. So, I’ll invite you to comment. I can’t promise to approve it. But, I might. And, I will respond in one form or another, to be certain.

So, engage me. Help me. Walk with me. Help me realize the Authentic Life.

If suicide is a path to another place that just might be a reward, as opposed to a punishment, why wouldn’t you take it? Is this an example of Kobayashi Maru?

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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the life of being a Hero

February15

I had planned an epic post around a revolutionary event featuring Haley Anne (no skallawag, she). And, woven into it was a planned ackwledgement that Rowdy, my Rhodesian Ridgeback, is now one year old.

However, one of life’s unexpected opportunities twists caught me in mid-stride today, and required otherwise swift and decisive action.

I have medals that might mean I’m a hero by some definition. But, I’ll assure you, here, that nothing compares to the awarding of a happy little daughter’s hug.

“Elfie”, a stuffed elf to many, but a meaningful friend to my Emma Jo, had gone missing. We concluded that she was left behind at my new offices during a visit today during some errands.

Emma Jo was devastated. And, her hiccuping plea for Daddy to: “go find her”, a challenge of no uncertain consequence, could not conceivably, go unanswered. And, in fact, she had made it clear that: “only Daddy can do it. he can do anything”.

And, I did just that.

I mounted my steed, in this case my Porsche, and gunned it through the twilight (admittedly with the windows down and cold air whooshing around me, mixing with the strains of Tom Petty blasting from the Bose sound system – and, me howling along, the Knight errant).

Otherwise, no drama.

I arrived home to naught but great fanfare, and an excited: “Elfie’s home!” – and, that big, big wonderful, glorious hug, with extra squeezes, and a smooth face nestled in my neck.

When it comes to Daddy’s and little girls, there is no mountain high enough. And, the rewards – and, awards abound.

Mind… You’ll be hearing about my other daughter, Haley Anne, and her own school-related (revolutionary) heroics, and soon.

I’m listening to Tom Petty’s: You Don’t Know How It Feels. So should you. And, play it loud.

Peace be to my Brothers and sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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Bat Masterson

December11

So long Gene Barry.

To me, you will always be that debonaire Bat Masterson. They don’t play it that way any longer. Perhaps they never did. They, whoever, they may be, certainly should.

One of the coolest parts of the Television series was that the Bat Masterson character, portrayed by Mr. Barry, often beat his adversaries senseless with the use of his gold-tipped cane, as opposed to the use of firearms (with which he was equally dexterous).

My Grandad would say: “now there’s a gentleman – for you”. And, if he were, tragically, absent from the living room, then my Dad would always carry the banner. It was a determined play on words, and directed amicably towards the hapless villains. Oh, and they were a dastardly bunch.

Great stuff, really.

Please join me with a rousing rendition of the Bat Masterson THEME SONG:

“Back when the West was very young

There lived a man named Masterson

He wore a cane and derby hat

They called him Bat

Bat Masterson!

A man of steel, the story says

But women’s eyes all glanced his way.

A gambler’s game he always won

His name was Bat

Bat Masterson!

Refrain

The trail that he blazed is still there

No one has come since to replace his name

and those with too ready a trigger,

forgot to figure on his lightning cane.

Now in the legend of the West

One name stands out above the rest

The man who had the fastest gun,

His name was Bat

Bat Masterson!”

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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