The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

optimism

September26

so… I’m that guy, who, faced with great uncertainty, fueled by incalculatable odds and supported by evidence to the contrary of my very nature, is obnoxiously optimistic.

people, and collectively, have been telling me that I’m “nuts” most of my life (others have added “silly”, but I don’t want to discuss that, here). I’ll submit this sentiment is generally offered when tough spots are afoot.

but, wasn’t that the point when, during WWII, Lieutenant Kinnard advised General McAuliffe to tell a German vanguard “Nuts!” in the face of almost certain defeat, and then stood firm and victorious through four days of un-Godly hell?

by the way… isn’t God, really, the boss of both heaven and hell? our discernment (that he gave us) is a path, but he is ultimately the arbiter, right?

by the way… in eleven years I’ll be sixty years old. I have a lot of work to do between now and then, that will certainly require a great deal of enthusiasm and optimism. meanwhile, for the fiftieth year milestone, instead of scooting away for a romantic, and possibly self-indulgent weekend, Joanne arranged for my sister-in-law and favorite brother-in-law-ish (don’t get me wrong, I’m incredibly fond of Jeanette and Chris) to visit from England for a small-group trip to Boston. what should I read into that?

well… I’m fiercely determined to make it the best trip ever for Joanne, Jeanette and Chris, and pleased with the opportunity (I’m nuts about Joanne, and that’s not “silly”).

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

riddle, or paradox, or what ever

September20

Someone pointed me to a link showing a couple of religious leaflets that they’d found. It’s all quite interesting, in a flagellating kind of way, I suppose.

a leaflet

It took a lot of effort to load one of them into this post, and I’m not at all, not all, I tell you, convinced it’s worth the effort. And, after all my work, it’s still grainy, almost like some form of pornography, and difficult to read – let alone fathom. Just use your imagination. You have, after all seen hundreds just like  it. And, if you haven’t, it’s no true tragedy. I say this because, after all, it’s a religious artifact. God will live on, one way or another, well past the point the bloody leaflet is dust.

Why are things like this called “leaflets”, any way?

In any event, I don’t really understand something about the evangelist logic illustrated in things like leafllets and religious artifacts, in general. In their analogy (use your imagination here – or, perhaps you’ve decided to, otherwise, take a nap, especially if Georgia is playing in an American football game), I’m a terrible felon standing in front of a judge; I’m guilty of murder and theft, among many other crimes. I should probably go to prison, as I’m clearly a danger to society.

Yet evangelists would posit that a monetary fine would pay for my crimes, and it doesn’t even have to be me who pays it. Jesus will apparently pay the fine, and I can leave the court that very day. I suppose I’d have to promise to pay him back – but as they point out in the first part of the leaflet, I’m a liar as well as a thief. I am man, after all. Apparently, and according to those ferocious evangelists, God made man to sin, and not made man capable of sin, which puts a different spin on everything.

Perhaps it’s all a form of cosmic riddle.

The key to freedom, as it were, is accepting Jesus.

So, if I do pay Jesus back, by being his friend (or, at least asking him over for a play date), I get to go to heaven. Although I remain a sinner even when I’m friends with him.

Why would Jesus want so many evil friends? Unless it’s to make him look all the more noble by association.

I understand the “evil friend” question is where everyone is going to pounce on me, with a love of course.

The more I find out about Christianity, as a religion, as opposed to simply coming to grips with a mighty God, and how I make that work for everyone around me (truth and light, reflecting and representing, etc. /1), the stranger it seems.

Paradox(?) you might pondering a this point… Well, perhaps it’s that point where you must face the difference between faith, religion, belief and discernment. It’s after all, why God gave you a brain – and, made it larger (not necessarily better) than a dog /2 or chimpanzee’s (cats don’t count, ever.).

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

________________________

1/ I could hyperlink to many examples of my prior work on these topics. However, they’ve become copious in number. So, it’s a lot of work. And, if you actually cared (and, I understand many of you do, and will, ultimately), you’ll search and sort them out. All you need is the desire and proactive nature to utilize the search feature offered to the left of this post.

2/ One of my favorite posts: Sammy: The best argument I ever knew for Dogs in Heaven has now been read over 4,000,000 times. It’s being read in schools (one teacher told me it’s how he gets around the ban on religious (ouch) information. That’s fine. It’s kinda like being a pirate. Certainly a Prudent Gentleman.

Off topic: I think it’s funny that spell check doesn’t correct the word ‘kinda’.

Dogs In Heaven

January5

I am told that Dog’s don’t (or won’t) see Heaven. However, they see every thing in/ as black and white.

With dogs is pretty simple: If you pet and feed them, they love you and will die for you. If you kick them, they can tear out your throat.

But, people don’t easily see things in “black and white”. We need to make every thing we can as complicated as possible. We even use psychological rationalizing terms like “co-dependency” to explain and justify situations whereby if you beat your girl friend, she loves you harder.

Okay… So, do Dogs (pets in general) go to Heaven?

This question probably enters the mind of every pet owner, especially when they lose a beloved pet companion. We have pets that have personalities and feelings, and can think and reason. It seems as though whatever it is that makes each pet unique (a soul) is like that which makes each human unique. Therefore, we wonder if pets (or any other animals) go to heaven.

Before going on, it is most important to state that if pets do go to heaven, their owners will also have to go to heaven to see them. The Bible makes it clear that the majority of people will not go to heaven—see Matthew chapter 7, verses 13 and 14 (Mat 7:13,14) for one example. Therefore, it is critical that we remind everyone that they need to get right with God themselves or their chances of seeing a departed pet again are zero.

There are numerous examples of animals associated with heaven (including 2 Kings 2:11, Revelation 5:13 and 19:11-14) or the “new creation” (Isaiah 65:17-25). Still, the question is: “were these animals new creations or do these animals include reborn earthly creatures?” Let’s look at the facts.

Both mankind and animals are formed from the ground (Genesis 2:7, 19). This reveals that the physical bodies of both are similar, but it does not tell us about their immortality.

God’s covenant with Noah included both people and animals (Genesis 9:9-11). However, that covenant was not one of eternal life, but that He would not again destroy the earth with a flood.

The fourth commandment as recorded in Deuteronomy 5:12-15 includes a Sabbath rest for animals as well as people. Again, it reveals some equality between people and animals, but makes no statement regarding animals going to heaven.

God takes care of both men and animals (see Matthew 6:26 and Psalm 104—verses 14 and 27-30 in particular). Although death is mentioned in Psalm 104:29, we learn nothing regarding an afterlife.

At some future time, Christ (a Rod from the stem of Jesse) will bring about a time of peace where all animals and man will be in harmony (Isaiah 11:1-9). Still, the description is not necessarily of heaven, and these animals are not necessarily reborn animals.

Notice the recurring theme, although animals are our “equals” in some ways, none of these passages tells us anything about whether an animal has eternal life.

Some writers claim that “all things” in passages like Acts 3:19-21, Philippians 3:20,21, Hebrews 2:8, and Revelation 21:5 include animals. The passage in Romans 8:18-25 certainly does include animals as part of “the creation.” Still, none of these passages reveals that the animals and plants included in “the creation” are reborn rather than newly created.

Ephesians 1:3-14 is a passage that speaks of redemption through Christ’s sacrifice. (Redemption concerns setting someone or something free that belonged to another.) Specifically, verse 10 states “that in the dispensation of the fullness of the times He might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven and which are on earth—in Him.” Here, “all things” is universal—spiritual and material. That is, this passage is speaking about bringing everything back to a perfect “Genesis chapter 1” condition. Again, this does not directly comment on the eternal life of animals.

It seems more reasonable and logical to me that Heaven includes having a great dog at your side. Few of my friends are willing to chase balls into a lake for me. And, I had Black Labs named Maxx and Sammy that I believe belongs in Heaven more than some people I have met.

Peace to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

Share this Blog with friends or enemies (via Twitter). Do it!:

Archives

Linkedin

View Brian Cork's profile on LinkedIn

Categories