The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

awesomeness

September14

Do you, reader, care that things which are awesome can be referred to as, or having: “awesomeness”, even though it’s not proper grammar (at least this is apparently the case by folk that that track such things)? But, because it’s, well… awesome, it’s simply okay?

I surf (not the web necessarily… although I do that as well, much like yourself), and do all manner of, generally, dangerous things (but, mind you… I don’t text and drive – I have my kids text for me while I drive). But, things that move me are typically referred to as awesome, and/ or have awesomeness.

It’s true. As evidenced by the simple fact that it’s right here, and in writing, no less. And, also lived, thusly.

So, there you have it.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

posted under Life, Stuff | No Comments »

pillaging ministries for Prophet

February21

So…

I may well have the coolest job in the world. I might shy away from referring to it as a “calling”. But, I really enjoy the work I do. And, I see evidence, daily, that it’s meaningful.

There are many aspects to what I do. But, relevant to the line-of-thinking tied to this post is my efforts around and through men who start businesses from a “best practices” standpoint – and, also ministries (which are a form of business, but not necessarily oriented around best practices).

I’m guessing I’ll discuss that latter topic on a broader scale later (the list of topics I ache to share is endless, and my energy boundless).

But, readers of this Blog already know that.

In any event, I’m going to share a brief exchange I’ve had in the last twenty four hours with John. He is my good and dear friend. He is struggling. But, it’s a healthy and worthy (possibly noble) form of struggle. It’s cool being around it. Especially having the sense that’s it’s going to end well.

By the way… And, don’t bother rolling your eyes… John is likely a kind of Prophet. And, like many Biblically-oriented figures he often can’t heal himself. But, like any good flame, good things could be drawn to it.

Is this John’s Kobayashi Maru? Or, is my role in walking with such men an example of that un-winnable test always demonstrating, and proves, character development is the best result?

In any event, here’s the exchange. Make of it what you will, or must. I certainly will. In fact, I’ve already started thinking about drawing lines of corollary  thought relative to Charles Darwin, men who think they should start ministries, and the gene-pool (this does not include John).

On Feb 18, 2010, at 6:46 PM, John XXXX wrote:

“Thoughts on doing both e29 and ministry?

Does my passion for ministry exclude the need for work? Is ministry the work?

Ideas coming to mind? You know me and know my heart.  And, you will speak candidly to me.

That’s what I need right now.

Peace & Favor,

John”

What came to my mind, and from my heart:

“I’ve always felt that good work was a form of Ministry in it’s own right.

Show me a man who is evangelistic over his products and services, and you’ll see a man on fire in the belief that he is helping people, supporting his family, and honoring God in more ways than I could describe in this email.

I might humbly use myself as an example. I see evidence, every day, that I am making a keen difference in the lives of good people around me. My own daughter describes my work simply as: “Daddy helps people”.

You know… The Nordic (because there were several varieties) Vikings believed that Valhalla was a  place you went to fight, drink and wench for eternity. This was a reward for doing great work (pillaging was more a hobby) on earth using the skills and strength God (in a manner of speaking) gave them.

…maybe… Just maybe, one reason Ministries fail more often than even secular business startups is because the instigators start on the wrong foot with poorly formed financial models, certainly flawed market validation, and  – and worse, desires.”

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

perhaps Jesus should be a bit more Noble

September6

I’ll begin this post by making it clear, front-and-center, that I don’t expect anything from God.

He’s already given me a fighting chance with that special gift of discernment. And, since many of you follow this Blog more often than not, you know my thoughts and gratitude for that.

And, considering just how big I suspect God is, I don’t see any point in offering up naught but unconditional love – anyway.

“P.S. Jesus is his own Dad.”

What happens if we find out God prefers that we stop focusing on the rules imposed by a particular religion, and work towards having a direct relationship with Him? Perhaps it’s Jesus (or, his promoters, are a more likely choice) that should be a bit more noble (his sacrifice /1, notwithstanding). And, by the way… As I have discussed on this Blog before (Christian Ambiguity Part II and Faith + Evidence = integrity, for example), I try, daily, to do good in this world with the idea an uncertain result might be it’s own reward. I hope that reflects and represents courage, in some form.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

_______________________

1/ A reminder that, as a Heterodox, I don’t see the point in arguing against Jesus walking the earth. We can see daily that he makes a difference, still. But, I don’t know if he rose from the dead. If I did know, it would make life simpler, wouldn’t it? But, it would also require less courage on my part.

brian cork: Defending A Belief

September25

This is me pondering faith, and why we think the way (or, in the manner [process?]) we do (or, don’t).

[Deep Breath]

Scientific validity is not the result of scientists abstaining from making value judgments; it is the result of scientists making their best effort to value principles of reasoning that reliably link their beliefs to reality, through valid chains of evidence and argument.

So, perhaps an answer to the (two-part) question – “What should I believe; and, why should I believe it?” is generally a scientific one:

Believe a proposition because it is well supported by theory and evidence.

Believe it because it has been experimentally verified.

Believe it because a generation of smart people have tried their best to falsify it –  and, failed.

Believe it because it is true (or seems so).

This is a norm of cognition as well as the epistemic core of any scientific mission statement.

This may-or-may-not be related.  But, if you want to go deep, consider the theory of “Probabistically”. /1

Or, perhaps you believe it (a thing, or any thing) because you simply trust your heart and instincts.

Or, someone you know, and like, inspires you to cast aside science, and make the  leap.

There is also the option of believing in a thing only because you want it.

All this aside…  I believe in me – and my discerning judgment.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

______________________

1/ I did not make this word up (this time).  Consider…  Nassim Nicholas Taleb

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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