The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

blogging about my blog

December27

is blogging about your blog a demonstration of conceit, or some dark example of self-grandizing?

I’ve only just reported on Linked in that…

brian corkhttp://lnkd.in/bmVmuVC : uh-oh… My blog archives are getting a lot of looks today. this probably has nothing to do with my ghastly, yet potentially transparent Linkedin picture.

HINT: the only person that tried too hard this year was Miley Cyrus, and Lance Armstrong (like Detroit) evidently did not try hard enough. typically not that many people actually care about my rants, musing, and odd recipes. however, this probably means I’m going to take a beating over something.

I’m putting-up this post and tagging it with, “blogs”, “public opinion”, “controversy”, and “brian cork”, just to see what happens.

stay tuned.

peace to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

Sarah Palin is hot and Obama is NOT

October25

Brian Patrick Cork:

all I care about this story is that Sara Palin hunts bear! Obama only shoots hoops and greens (and poorly at that).

we need a Hilary and Sarah ticket (I don’t care about mixed parties, here). wild game would never be the same. that would be a great campaign platform.

Sarah Palin Too Busy Bear Hunting, Won’t Appear On Piers Morgan – socialnewsdaily.com

Sarah Palin would love to appear on Piers Morgan’s show but she’s just too busy at the moment. The former governor of Alaska posted a message to her Facebook page today saying that she had to decline Morgan’s offer because she was too busy bear…”.

if Sarah Palin had challenged Barack Obama to an arm-wresting match, we would not be in the current healthcare nightmare we are facing.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

does Christ have a fake ID?

December26

I started this post abut a week ago, but kept losing both my enthusiasm and focus.

that was until I ran towards a thought, as opposed to from one.

Emma Jo still exhibits too much wonder and joy this time of year, and I worked hard to savor every moment of that. then I saw an article reminding us, collectively, that there is no validated evidence that Jesus Christ was, in truth, born on December 25th. that started to really bug me. however, Saturday I had a very good run at North Park. I started out a bit sore and thinking I might want to dial it back a bit. but, by the second circuit I was feeling pretty light-footed and decided to put some steam into play. the “zone” realized itself and my mind wandered with my good form. that’s when I was (thunder) struck by the notion that I believed Christ rose from the dead.

just like that.

no justification. no debate. not even a “why not”, to allow for some wiggle-room.

there was this sense that I could not prove it did not happen. and, I’d been playing the Heterodox card so long I had forgotten the circular argument that, ultimately, believing in a thing (any thing) is potentially much like believing in oneself. there are times when we prevail against great odds. and, I’m certain faith has it’s role in that.

so, I’ve elected to keep some of the early thinking alive in this post. however, now you know, as do I.

meanwhile, I fully understand that this post is going to generate a great deal of consternation. I expect the shaking of fists, and possibly teeth gnashing. lofty-minded opinions may be hurled my way.

so… was Jesus really born on December 25th?

does it matter?

original thinking that geared this controversial topic must needs be, and should be attributed to Angie Mosteller, and probably God, for that matter.

but, we must also submit ourselves, collectively to the aforementioned Heterodox.

I’m confident that Jesus walked the earth and died on a cross. I don’t know that He rose from the dead (as we think we understand death) to seal the deal around a covenant between Himself, God and the rest of us. however, I’m genuinely satisfied that this is the case though because there is a clear advantage there for all of us. and, we’ll make that assumption going forward with this post so we don’t get bogged-down with tangental discourse.

you may be pausing, right about now and taking your own wonder at the veritable lack of drama, here. but, in truth, it’s more calm, for me – much like the way after I feel after a good run.

make a note that I also think I know that Jesus was a Rabbi leading up to his death. although I can’t point to the relevant scripture, His being a Rabbi, from the line of David (through Mary, and possibly Joseph as well) is mentioned throughout the New Testament (Books of Matthew and John 1:14, for example) /1.

…there’s some random thinking, for you. I love and value random, heart-felt, unrestricted, irreverent, untamed, Kobayashi Maru-drenched, thought.

by the way…

“Most people who profess a deep love of the Bible have never actually read the book,” Rabbi Rami Shapiro told CNN during a recent interview. “They have memorized parts of texts that they can string together to prove the biblical basis for whatever it is they believe in, but they ignore the vast majority of the text.”

these baring points are relevant, here, because the point of this post is to pin-down points of logic hopefully based in fact but impacted by sequential logistics that include science in the form of astrology, technology (the press), and matters of convenience, ironically originating from the catholic Church.

I grew up delighted with the calendar event of Christmas day and the date of December 25th. now I relish Emma Jo’s own delight. but, there are rumblings a-plenty that date was chosen in an effort to “Christianize” a pagan holiday. Tim Barker recently shared with me an article on just that topic. I contemplated adding my own research and perspective. but, I love interest in that in the face of calm perspective. however, it’s (the, and other, related articles) subsequently been a terrific source of lively debate between myself and a few buddies, and an interesting teaching opportunity for my own kids (although we need to tread lightly around the Santa Claus element for the time being).

in any event, like everything else in our lives, the Heterodox inevitably rears it’s head for me and creates the “truth-of-the day” based on current information. but, I’m still fascinated by how the date of December 25th was potentially selected.

though the gospels of Matthew and Luke both give an account of Christ’s birth, neither one provides a date for this great event. Though it may sound strange to our modern minds, it is likely that early Christians did not place any particular value on birthdays.

it was not until the third century that various pockets of Christians began to show interest in the date of Christ’s birth, and it would take another century for the Church to begin celebrating it with some uniformity. the first clear record of Christ’s birth on December 25 was not until 336 AD, but it is possible that the church had accepted the date long before and that it was already common knowledge. regardless, even if the dating of Christ’s birth was owed in part to the pagan holiday, “The Birthday of the Unconquered Sun,” the influence was probably only secondary. it appears that the primary goal of the Church was to determine an appropriate date, one that Christians expected to be rich in symbolism. if this date, December 25, also happened to give the Church a sacred feast with which to counter pagan celebrations, then it was arguably the best possible choice for the day on which to honor Christ’s birth.

by the third century, it appears that some Christians had started celebrating Christ’s birth, as well as his death, on March 25th.

go look it up. do it!

so, why were Christians celebrating Christ’s birth and death on the same day? well… there’s an ancient Jewish tradition of “integral age” or “whole year theory” that evidently influenced this practice. it is a belief that the life of a Jewish prophet began and ended on the same day. most good Rabbi’s know this. a third century Christian, Sextus Julius Africanus (note: most of the valid research evidently occurred in the third century), added an interesting component to this theory. he argued that Christ’s life began not at birth, but at conception (thus the Catholic views around birth contro?). his case proves to be of particular relevance, because if Christ was conceived on March 25th, he would have been born roughly nine months later on December 25th, the date on which our current discussion is focused, eh.

but look… you can Google, Bing, or, what-ever “facts around Christ’s birth”, and get all manner of data and information. but, it really does not matter. dates don’t matter. calendars have changed and evolved. man has clearly manipulated fact and information. however, God gave us discernment. and, mine is edged with faith, now. I’ve tried to intellectualize all of it. all of it, mind you. but, that does not work for me, today. so, that’s the sublime beauty of the Heterodox – I’ve realized my truth of the day, and will remain satisfied that darkness can try and prove otherwise. that’s how I nimbly side-step the hypocrisy issue.

so, perhaps more simply stated, I believe in Jesus. in part, because I believe in myself. I’m of the opinion that God relishes my own thinking and He designed me for such purposes. thank God.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

1/ Men better than myself, teachers, tell me that Rabbi’s start memorizing scripture (i.e. the Torah – which is largely the first five books of the Old Testament) as soon as they are able to read along with any other good (subjective) Jew. then at the age of twelve they either took up the family trade or become a Rabbi (this entailed memorizing the rest of the Old Testament). Point-of-reference: There is the story where Mary and Joseph left Jesus in town and upon their return came back they found him studying scripture with the “other” Rabbis.  Also, I believe that when he is much older He goes to Peter, James, and John (who are in the family trade of fishing) and asks them to drop their nets and follow Him. I’m advised that they would not have done so unless he had authority (being anointed by God, nonetheless). If they followed Him they could potentially become a Rabbi themselves, and move-up in social class.

the Flash on Apple debate isn't PC

August13

It appears that European Union regulators are joining forces with the Federal Trade Commission here in the U.S. through a probe of Apple’s policy regarding “mobile software developers.” (This means: Flash on the iPhone.)

I’m advised by insiders that Apple will be further confronted over the controversial “Flash on iPhone” policy. As you know, Apple claims that Adobe’s Flash isn’t “sufficiently advanced for use on smart-phones”, and has effectively banned its use on their iOS devices, both as a platform as well as its use to help program applications.

If they call me to testify as an expert witness, I’d likely offer this line-of-thinking and example:

I’ve known many PC users over the course of my life, and work passionately to help them transition to the Mac OS (it’s perfectly okay to drop the Mac OS onto a Dell, for example, like Nicholas Johnson did for me on a dare, of sorts).

But, for the purpose of this post, I’ll focus on a close friend of mine named Chuck. Many of you have read his book, and I coached him through one of the most monumental acquisitions in North America.

Chuck is a PC survivor (I wonder if that phrase and context will catch on. You read it, here, first). He languished in that world of restarts and hangups for almost sixteen years.

We discuss the Adobe and Flash story fairly often because it has created terrific impetus for change and a kind of thought leadership around reverse accountability. Chuck knew all too well about third-party applications and programs causing instability on the original platform. How many times do you download a program that requires a plug-in to run on your system? He’s posed that question, and often. How many times has a new program or plug-in been the proverbial “fly in the ointment” of your Operating System? Many PC sufferers ask both questions. But, never, as a hearty and ferocious macintoshionist (I just coined that as well), would say, I.

Chuck’s house has been one hundred percent Apple (PC free) since January 2008. iPods, Macbooks, iMacs, iTV, Extreme Base Stations, iPhones and now iPads abound. When the Apple vs. Adobe story began to break Chuck called me from his iPhone (decidedly not a Blackberry) to express his gratitude towards me and Steve Jobs for developing devices that “just work”. Turn the device on; it works. The story is simple with the elegance of Apple design and utilization. NOTE: I fully expect to hear from a few of you that still want to harp on the iPhone 4’s reception issue. But, I’ll wave you off dismissively and advise you to stop grasping desperately at a futile effort to find a weakness in the that tasty [sic] Apple.

So… Steve Jobs is likely telling us the truth and Flash will destabilize the iPhone and the iPod Touch. If that’s the case he is demonstrating accountability by kicking Flash to the curb. He is forcing Adobe to improve it’s product – and, that is fair and reasonable. It’s aligned with the Laws of Natural Selection. Improve or die. If Adobe wants to occupy the apple mobile platform, they should step up and (re)write something more stable that does not use a lion’s share of power (this is another issue with Flash that does not get enough press, eh).

Why should Apple allow an unstable piece of software on a system that, otherwise,  just works?

Adobe comes across like an entitled Google neophyte with weak points and self-inflicted bitter frustration. Apple sets the standard for quality. And, Steve Jobs simply expects everyone around him, and his best-of-products, to work smart and keep up.

That’s okay. And, let’s hope the European Union recognizes this – just as discerning users of technology have around the globe have by buying ever-more Apple products.

You can whine, or drink wine. So, I’m buying a vineyard.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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