The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life

samsung galaxy being Stuffed by the iPad2

March22

for the moment, it’s a rumor…

but, I’m hearing that Samsung, possibly encouraged by Google, is “stuffing” their channels and counting that as part of their Galaxy sales numbers. let’s not discount the influence of that damn Smoking Rabbit.

can anyone, out there, confirm this?

Android tablets are getting dusted. they languish on the shelves while consumers are willing to wait for their iPads to ship.

I love it!

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

brian’s BEANS puzzle

February4

A brian’s BEANS puzzle

Take a good look at the picture below. It’s a puzzle, to be sure, for many.

I’m fully aware you may have heard tell of this exercise. And, yes, it’s part of the MENSA process. However, that’s only the beginning.

Let me know if it takes you under thirty seconds, or over thirty seconds to find the man in the beans.

Mind you, this does not necessarily have anything to do with brian’s BEANs. But, it might. Much hangs in the balance. More so for you, than for myself

When you are done with the exercise, please complete the poll below.

[polldaddy poll=4495490]

If you beat thirty seconds please reach out to me via the Contact Form. Do it!

NOTE: There is an honor system at work.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

you get what you vote for

September21

I’ve been tracking government decision-making. I’m never satisfied with how people of authority come to conclusions and then take action that directly affects my standard of living, and ability to wage best practices in business.

Oh really?

Allow me to form an example:

A key difference between experts in the private sector, and experts in the government sector, is that government experts have monopoly-like power (authority), ultimately backed by force (also known as implied threat).

The power of government experts is concentrated and unchecked. Or, at best, checked very poorly (if you disagree, you can come over, here, and fight me). On the other hand, the power of experts in the private sector is constrained by competition, and checked by choice. Private organizations have to satisfy the needs of their constituents (I use that particular word because of it’s relevance to members of the House and Senate for corollary consideration) in order to survive. Ultimately, private experts have to respect the dignity, if not best interests, of the individual, because the individual has the freedom to ignore the expert. It’s supposed to work this way with Congressmen and Senators, but they focus more on staying in power. So, this means they enforce the government authority. This is an obvious conflict.

Just so we’re clear… Barack Obama has filled his administration with “experts” and academics. But what about the private sector where real-world subject matter expertise is formed? Just look at his cabinet: only eight percent (8%) of Obama’s current cabinet represents people with private sector experience. All the rest are professional government hacks (as in hacking the Constitution, and Jefferson’s best hopes). Of course, we should consider Obama’s own professional resume. Our Commander and Chief’s “Bible” is apparently the book: Rules for Radicals by Saul D. Alinsky (read it. do it now!); his “work” experience was being a social-worker, and then a Senator; and, his greatest aspiration might well be to realize his father’s (A Harvard educated Luo Tribesman from Kenya with a Muslim up-bringing) political vision (think along anti-colonialism).

Read a lot more than you bargained for in my next Blog post.

Meanwhile… I might discuss this briefly – maybe soon. I’m thinking about it… But, with six weeks to go before vital elections, the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) (government experts, mind you) have declared that the recession is over! And, they back-dated the news for June just to make it look like it’s not all staged (well geez Brian, if it’s in writing, it must be true [middle-class American]). Don’t let Obama and his Democrat mob fool you with that one – please.

You’ve asked me to consider running for Governor. I’m thinking about that too.

You get what you pay for in life. And, ironically, I have an uneasy feeling a lot us us are going to pay out the #@% if this tomfoolery isn’t managed.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

China and the evolution revolution – the vital difference between a trend and a fad

July30

You’ll have no choice but to relish this example of evolution, of a kind.

And, I see a global revolution, of it’s own kind advancing like a glassy-fronted wave. And, it could very well “break” (that’s a good thing from a surfers view) right here on the shores of our own country (that’s the United States, by way of reminder).

Here is the background:

The word out of Shanghai is that factory workers demanding better wages and working conditions are hastening the eventual end of an era of cheap costs that helped make southern coastal China the world’s factory floor.

My people on the ground there are advising me that a series of strikes over the past two months have been a rude wake-up call for the many foreign companies that depend on China’s low costs to compete overseas, from makers of Christmas trees to manufacturers of gadgets like the iPad.

Where once low-tech factories and scant wages were welcomed in a China eager to escape isolation and poverty, workers are now demanding a bigger share of the profits.

So… It’s revolution intersecting evolution, then.

The government, meanwhile, is pushing foreign companies to make investments in areas it believes will create greater wealth for China, like high technology.

Many companies are striving to stay profitable by shifting factories to cheaper areas farther inland or to other developing countries, and, not just a few, are even resuming production in the West.

They have little choice. Many of today’s Chinese factory workers have both a taste of western influence, and now higher ambitions than their parents, who generally saved their earnings from assembling toys and television sets for retirement in their rural hometowns. This change-oriented generation are also choosier about wages and working conditions. “The conflicts are challenging the current set-up of low-wage, low-tech manufacturing, and may catalyze the transformation of China’s industrial sector,” said Yu Hai, a sociology professor at Shanghai’s Fudan University.

Even with recent increases, wages for Chinese workers are still a fraction of those for Americans (even their distant Indian brothers). However, studies clearly indicate that China’s overall cost advantage is shrinking. That’s a trend and not a fad.

It might turn out that outsourcing, in general, was the fad.

Labor costs have been climbing about fifteen percent (15%) a year since a 2008 labor contract law that made workers more aware of their rights. It should be noted that tax preferences for foreign companies ended in 2007. Land, water, energy and shipping costs are unquestionably on the rise.

In its most recent survey, issued in February, restructuring firm Alix Partners found that, overall, China was more expensive than Mexico, India, Vietnam, Russia and Romania. We’re investigating the Philippines (but, then so are most law enforcement agencies, eh).

Makers of toys and trinkets, Christmas trees and cheap shoes already have folded by the thousands or moved away, some to Vietnam, Indonesia or Cambodia. But those countries lack the huge work force, infrastructure and markets China can offer, and most face the same labor issues as China.

Here is an opportunity, if not form of prediction:

So, ironically the evolution of our own economy may be setting the stage and create opportunities for companies around the globe to bring manufacturing and related services back to the United States. We have massive infrastructure and trained people throughout the midwest ready, willing and able to take-on the assembly line for a chance at a dignified living. Now we need our own government to step-up and incentivize companies to create another industrial revolution.

Peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

Brian Patrick Cork

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

brian cork by John Campbell





photos by John Campbell

 

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