The Unsinkable brian cork™

Brian Patrick Cork is living the Authentic Life
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Calvin Coolidge and Instincts, Convictions, and Best Practices

August15

I was recently asked, “why would you care about someone like Calvin Coolidge?”

perhaps one reason the question was asked was because we were discussing Thomas Jefferson, and how the geo-political stage is so different today, set for Hilary Clinton (I’m just throwing that out there…), as compared to the era of our Founding Fathers.

earlier this week I published:

Instincts, Convictions, and Best Practices by brian patrick cork
Published on Linkedin August 12, 2014

it is dangerous to make decisions based on pleasing people. when we please the person in front of us and then change directions to please the next person we encounter, we’re not living according to moral convictions. we’re choosing what’s easy in the moment rather than being fully committed to righteousness.

for a vital point-of-reference ponder Revelations 3:16.

outside of Revelations here is a book that might find itself an example of my point, today:

Johnson, Charles C. (2013-03-12). Why Coolidge Matters: Leadership Lessons from America’s Most Underrated President.

Excerpts and thinking:

with vital input from George Landolt.

it was the legislators’ “solemn duty” to “think last of themselves.” Otherwise their decisions would “lack authority.” Calvin Coolidge wished to protect the legislature from itself and to guarantee that a republican spirit would continue in the state’s government.

although he had stood fast against attempts to raise the salaries of legislators, Coolidge favored increasing them for schoolteachers, believing that bad teachers would imperil republican government by failing to teach the convictions essential for republican life. He also exalted good teachers throughout his career.

as vice president, he said: The standards which teachers are required to maintain are continually rising. their work takes on a new dignity. it is rising above a calling, above a profession, into the realm of art. it must be dignified by technical training, ennobled by character, and sanctified by faith.

so…

for the most part, every president has their own rap. some have rhythm, others a dark legacy. but, every man (until Hilary) got that office based on merit that was needed at the time. circumstances change, and that platform often creates an unkind legacy.

Coolidge was something of an intellectual. He was not interested in politics. he wanted to make a point. he had money and influence. he was probably more of a throw-back that values the role of a founding father. I suspect he was be a fan of Thomas Jefferson. thusly, he had few friends. that said, he was a champion for important threads in the fabric of our culture and society.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

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it more than connecting dots

July23

I’m feeling on top of my game, today. this despite only using Google-centric products. this includes:

Chrome, a Chromebox, Airdroid, (very slick and polished – especially for an Android/ Chrome App) Gmail, an Android device, and an Nexus 7 (tablet).

one of the best parts of my own “job” is connecting best-of-class people.

this morning I had a Gartner executive tell me recently that my rolodex is worth $1B. while I’m skeptical, myself, I’ll warrant the number could be relevant depending on what part of the globe the sun happens to be setting on a particular moment.

this afternoon I had a coaching client report in last night after I had connected him with a past executive coaching client. My response to him was:

“You both breathe ‘rare air’. Bad-asses have their own radar. The Laws of Natural Selection create the right kind of pack.”

one of the best things I ever heard my Grandad say was,

“if you’re going to judge a man, do it by those around him”.

Let’s be part of the Solution.

brian patrick cork

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Riding the Waves of Business

April6

business is like a glassy-fronted wave. you need to know how to approach it and enjoy the ride as opposed to killing yourself working against the wrong currents.

metaphors are great at cocktail parties. but, they are awesome if you understand them, and know how to leverage their foundation.

I recently described the state of our economy to several of my clients through the following analogy:

“Everyone has been wondering when the economy would kick-back-in. However, it’s official, we are in crazy business mode across most of the country. What made the difference? Well… I think someone bought some foreclosure property, and while repairing their landscaping discovered a hidden lever (probably by the saline pool box). They pulled it and the lights came on everywhere. Now its a mad rush to get into the action. Welcome back everyone. Let’s build empires, shall we.”

that got a lot of attention and it went viral. I fielded some radio host chatter, and might get some national sound-bite opportunities.

more importantly, it’s true and evident. and, that’s great news for everyone, providing you, “play your cards right”, or depending on the “wave you ride”, and if you can view business like a chess board (I do). neither has to be a gamble those words imply. however, gambits provide opportunities. NOTE: gambits require information and understanding. experience certainly helps.

in any event, see below for a quick Linkedin exchange I had late in the week with the emphatic Rick Stengard.

Rick StengardRick Stengard Well said. It’s also true that corporations have been quietly cutting expenses and leaning out operations over the past 5 years. Everyone’s ready to get back to making money. We have one big road block left. The Federal and State Governments are now faced with a similar challenge to cut the fat. Have no doubt that will be a painful process but will benefit everyone in the end.

Brian Patrick CorkBrian Patrick Cork I don’t agree that corporate cut-backs have been “quiet” in nature. But, the pain is certainly evident. Meanwhile, we as a business community simply and collectively have decided it’s time to go back to work. Historically, government does not track to the commercial sectors. Instead of running parallel, they are often contrary to one another. But, look for the media’s hand in much of the signaling. Once they decide to write great news it will be a self-fulfilling prophecy.

On the other hand, this is simply how commerce works in terms commoditized business.

To wit… When one industry flags, others prosper. That said, the guys that own the Atlanta Ferrari and Maserati dealerships will tell you that cars are flying off their lots. Guess whom is buying them? Minority government contractors. More on that later. I bet I get a call from Mayor Kasim Reed as this comment is likely ignite the potential for a fire-storm. But, it’s accurate information. And, it offers insight into “how things work”.

Business is like a glassy-fronted wave. You need to know how to approach it and enjoy the ride as opposed to killing yourself working against the wrong currents.

oedipus rescued from tragedybeyond my correspondence with Rick I always find references to our government relative to business (and the economy) curious. while our current government has no clue how to stimulate the economy, the notion of government work is generally a oxymoron. but, here is the best part of this post, and I’m curious to see if people pick-up on this… when government expenditures and productivity flag, that is when they start bringing in high-powered and expensive consultants to bring everything back-online. and, in that regard, they behave just like corporate America (and, global commerce, for that matter). look for staffing and consulting companies to be exploding. that’s always a great indicator that the light have come-on and people are dashing about madly pulling levers and pushing buttons.

Ernst & Young is forecasting a growth in it’s own revenues of over $3 Billion dollars over the next twenty-four to thirty-six months.

“Over the next two decades, rising per capita wealth in rapid-growth markets will generate a significant growth opportunity for multinational companies. Understanding this market, and developing products and services that meet its needs, will become a strategic priority that cannot be ignored.”

that comes from one of my guys at E&Y on the innovative task force.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

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the price of admission does not always equal success

March5

This Startup Is Charging $3,000 For Its Database of the World’s Most… – venturebeat.com

“Imagine having access to a rolodex of two million of the wealthiest people in the world: bankers, private equity folk, and venture capitalists.”

Brian Patrick CorkThis fascinates me, today. However, once published I will ask to be placed on the “do not call list”.

While you want to earn the privilege of being in such a database, few of us will want to be accessed and bothered by people that want things from us. I’m wondering if those investors that put up $60m have thought this through.

I kind of doubt they would want to be contacted by the strangers that have to buy this list themselves. If you are in that database you probably already know many of the other people involved and could call from your $3000 a day jet.

Ayn Rand would smack the people on this list with her desk copy of, Atlas Shrugged. thi smight be a good example of some people pushing others on to a “burning platform”.

peace be to my Brothers and Sisters.

brian patrick cork

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What’s All This About?

"What am I looking at?", you might wonder.

Lots of stuff.

Meanwhile, here, I discuss events, people and things in our world - and, my (hardly simplistic, albeit inarticulate) views around them.

You'll also learn things about, well, things, like people you need to know about, and information about companies you can't find anywhere else.

So, while I harangue the public in my not so gentle way, you will discover that I am fascinated by all things arcane, curious about those whom appear religious, love music, dabble in politics, loathe the media, value education, still think I am an athlete, and might offer a recipe.

All the while, striving mightily, and daily, to remain a prudent and optimistic gentleman - and, authentic.

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